Study reveals that more people are turning to cannabis to treat chronic pain

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The use of all-natural cannabis continues to take over for pharmaceutical chemicals

According to various national surveys in recent years, approximately 55 million American adults, 22% of the population, have chronic pain, and nearly 20 million of those experience pain that interferes with their daily lives. People with bleeding disorders often develop arthritis and chronic pain due to years of joint bleeding. Fortunately, the legalization of cannabis has increased in recent times. According to one study, this has led to more and more adults turning to the plant to effectively treat these conditions in their bodies.

As more people in the US became addicted to opioid painkillers, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention issued stricter prescribing guidelines in 2016. This complicated the situation of obtaining painkillers for those people who really need them.

At about the same time, medical and recreational marijuana was legalized in some states. This decriminalization led more and more people with chronic pain to explore cannabis products, including marijuana and the chemical compound cannabidiol (CBD).

According to the results of a recent study, nearly one in three people opt for medical marijuana for long-term pain relief. For many patients, cannabis is an alternative to painkillers; it is much easier to get than painkillers, and it works in a way they are comfortable with, whereas some of the painkillers have side effects that concern them.

After completing a survey designed by researchers at the John Hopkins University School of Public Health in Baltimore and the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, it has become evident that participants who lived with chronic pain and lived in states that allowed access to medical cannabis have experienced a better quality of life thanks to the effects of the plant. The data comes as no surprise, given that marijuana is credited with chronic pain as its main target.