Another case for cannabis as a treatment for autism

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Pharmaceutical drugs aren’t providing the relief they intend – marijuana can

There is already a significant amount of evidence that points to cannabis being effective in treating autism. While it’s one thing to point to lab tests to support a hypothesis or scientific findings, it’s something completely different when a real-world scenario can substantiate the claims. Such is the case for one family out of Rhode Island, who is now convinced about the benefits of medical cannabis. 

“Dylan” is an average 13-year-old, with the exception of having to deal with autism. As with most autism patients, he has good days and bad and his bad days are not his fault – they’re simply a result of the disease.

On one particularly bad day, Dylan came home from school with an embarrassing report. He had been admonished for “27 instances of property destruction” and “25 incidences of aggression.” In addition, he had “only” one self-injurious behavior – a low amount compared to many days.

His parents have tried a number of different pharmaceutical drugs to control his outbursts – Ritalin, Abilify, Klonopin and others – and nothing has worked. They have also tried a dietary regimen that was suggested could control the autism. They have failed, as well.

A year ago, Dylan had to be hospitalized for almost five weeks because he was out of control. On the advice of a pediatric psychologist, his parents began a program that included medical marijuana. On a daily basis, he is given 25mg of cannabis-infused olive oil directly into the mouth. The results are extremely encouraging.

Says Dylan’s father, “I notice in the morning he’s been a little easier to get along with. He’s not as angry. He’s not waking up angry, he’s waking up and, and you know, just getting ready and doing his thing, and asking to get dressed and asking for breakfast.”

It’s because of children like Dylan, and the positive results they have shown, that medical marijuana has been approved in Rhode Island for treating autism symptoms. Now if only other states would follow the pioneering efforts of The Ocean State.